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[EN] Listen and Learn in Esperanto: "Pli ol Fantazio"


The story "Pli ol Fantazio" was selected from the book "Kruko kaj Baniko en Bervalo" by Louis Beaucaire. Turn on subtitles in the video, or click here to download the book and read along! I've included a list of some words and phrases from the text that you might not understand right away.

Voluptovendistino: This word is formed from five parts: Volupto- (sensual pleasure), -vend- (the root for sales and selling), -ist- (the suffix used to denote an occupation or professional relationship), -in- (the suffix used to specifically indicate a woman), and the noun ending -o. Or in other words, a woman who professionally sells pleasure, or "a woman of the night."

Putino: This word is formed from three parts: Put- (the root for a deep hole or well), -in- (the suffix used to specifically indicate a woman), and the noun ending -o. Or in other words, this is the vulgar slur for "whore" and is not appropriate for polite conversation.

Geiĝa: This short word is formed from three parts: Ge- (refering to the presence of both genders at once), -- (the suffix to mean "becoming" or "moving into another state"), and -a (the adjectival ending). Or in other words, the joining of the genders.

Droŝko: A small, horse-drawn cart, usually with room only for the driver in front and a small load in back.

Krabli (intransitive): To move with a wriggle or scramble

Kafmuelilo: This word is formed from four parts: Kaf- (the root for coffee), -muel- (the root for milling or grinding), -il- (the suffix used to indicate a tool or instrument), and the noun ending -o. In other words, a coffee grinder!

Bulonjo: This is the Esperantization of the name of the French city, Boulogne, which in 1905 hosted the first world congress of Esperanto, and where the creator Dr. Zamenhof shared "The Essence of Esperanto" which continues to define the language to this day. Read more about it here!

Baskulo: a see-saw.

Ataita: This is formed from two parts: Ata- (the present passive participle ending used to show something that is presently being acted upon), and -ita, the past passive participle to show something that has been acted upon. This doesn't really mean anything and it's just a reference to long-standing debate about when to use the past passive or the present passive.

Tikli (transitive): To tickle.

Ventumilo: This word is formed from four parts: Vent- (the root for "wind"), -um- (the suffix to show an undefined action or object related to the root), -il- (the suffix used to show a tool or instrument), and -o (the noun ending.) Or in other words, a fan to blow air.

Roterdama Ueado: "Roterdamo" is the Esperantization of the city Rotterdam in the Netherlands where you'll find the headquarters for the UEA (Universal Esperanto Association) which promotes the language world-wide and is the chief organizer of the annual world congress of Esperanto. You might not recognize "Ueado" because it's a bit of humorous word-play which uses the abbreviation UEA as a root word which receives the suffix -ad- (used to denote a continuous or repeating action) and the noun ending -o. The given phrase is something that doesn't translate very well into English, but could in other words mean, "Rotterdamian UEA'ing."

Interna ideo: This refers to the "internal idea" of Esperanto, or in other words, what the language is supposed to be used for. Read more about it here!

Midzuminado: This word is composed of five parts: Midz- (the root for oral sex and fellatio), -um- (the suffix to show an undefined action or object related to the root), -in- (the suffix used to specifically indicate a woman or the female gender), -ad- (used to denote a continuous or repeating action), and the noun ending -o. There's no eloquent translation of this word in English, but it means something like, "The act of sustained oral sex performed by a woman."

Anheli (intransitive): To pant, breathe hard.

Ellaciĝi (intransitive): This verb is formed from four parts. The preposition El- (when used as a prefix for a verb or adjective, shows completeness or thoroughness), -lac- (the root for being tired or exhausted), -- (the suffix to mean "becoming" or "moving into another state"), and -i (the ending used to create a verb.) Or in other words, "to become completely exhausted."

Comments

  1. I honestly learned way too much just from the glossary. Time to make some anki flashcards.

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  2. Thanks for letting me know you found it helpful. I've been doing these about twice a month, but work is entering peak season until January so I'll probably just do one longer version of this a month with selections from books I'm reading. See you next time!

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